NewAge Gathering

Health in the New Age

‘Allergies’

Researchers May Have Found Key to Peanut Allergy Cure

Food allergies affect around 15 million children in the United States. A team of Australian researchers may have made progress in finding the cure to peanut allergies. Around 15 million children in the United States are allergic to food — meaning about two allergic kids are in every classroom. In a relatively small study, scientists from the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute gave 30 allergic children small daily doses of peanut protein with a probiotic (Lactobacillus rhamnosus) in increasing amounts over 18 months. They gave a control group of 30 allergic children a placebo. “Astoundingly, researchers found over 80 percent of children who received the oral immunotherapy treatment were able to tolerate peanut [sic] at the end of the trial, compared to less than 4 percent of the placebo group,” reads a press release. “This is… Read More

Are You Allergic to Rain?

By Dr. Mercola Dust mites, animal dander, molds, and pollen are among the most common environmental triggers of asthma attacks and allergy symptoms. For some, however, a spring or summer thunderstorm may lead to a flare-up of symptoms. Research shows an association between thunderstorm activity and worsening of allergy and asthma symptoms; one study found a 3 percent increase in emergency-room visits for asthma attacks in the 24 hours following thunderstorms.1 As the researchers explained: “While a three percent increase in risk may seem modest, asthma is quite prevalent… and a modest relative increase could have a significant public health impact in the population.” What Causes Thunderstorm Asthma? The phenomenon, known as “thunderstorm asthma,” isn’t so much an issue of people being allergic to rain. Instead, thunderstorms form the “perfect storm,” literally,… Read More

2005: Asthma explained by common allergy to milk and dairy products

The link between asthma and cows’ milk is familiar to many young asthma sufferers and their parents. I first became aware of the connection through my cousin’s experiences with his four-year-old son. Since infancy, my cousin’s son has experienced severe asthma attacks and has been hospitalized twice for asthma-related pneumonia. When his asthma attacks become more frequent or more severe, my cousin and his wife respond by temporarily eliminating milk and milk products from his diet, and it usually works. I always assumed that milk worsened his asthma by stimulating mucus production in his lungs. However, studies suggest that, either along with or instead of creating excess mucus, milk may worsen asthma due to an undiagnosed milk allergy. “In all respiratory conditions, mucous-forming dairy foods, such as milk and cheese, can exacerbate… Read More